Nam prik ong (northern tomato and meat sauce)

Yield: 4 servings

Measure Ingredient
\N \N Stephen Ceideburg
¼ pounds Pork tenderloin *
2 teaspoons Vegetable oil
1 tablespoon Minced garlic (3 cloves)
1 large Shallot, minced
2 \N Serrano chilies, with seeds, chopped
1 teaspoon Tiny dried shrimp, minced, or 1/2 tsp. shrimp paste
1 teaspoon Minced fresh lemon grass **
1 pounds Ripe plum tomatoes, chopped or: ***
½ cup Defatted chicken stock or water
1 tablespoon Fish sauce
1 teaspoon Sugar

* trimmed of fat and membrane and cut in chunks ** or 1 tsp. dried, soaked in warm water for 30 minutes, drained and minced *** 1 28-oz. can plum (Italian-style) tomatoes, drained and chopped Not unlike a That version of spaghetti sauce, this is from the regional cuisine of north Thailand. Note: Dried shrimp and shrimp paste give off a strong aroma during cooking, but the flavor mellows.

Place pork in a food processor and using an on/off motion, process until it is ground. Alternatively, chop pork with a sharp knife. Set aside.

In a heavy, medium-sized saucepan, heat oil over medium high heat. Add garlic and stir-fry for 1 to 2 minutes, or until browned. Add shallots, chilies, dried shrimp or shrimp paste and lemon grass and stir-fry for 30 seconds. Add the pork and stir-fry for about 1 minute, or until browned.

Add tomatoes, stock or water, fish sauce and sugar and increase the heat to high. Cook, stirring frequently, for 2 minutes, or until the mixture boils vigorously. Reduce heat to low and simmer, uncovered, for 15 to 20 minutes, or until slightly thickened. Serve with sticky rice.

Serves 4 as a main dish or 6 in combination with other dishes.

64 CALORIES FOR EACH OF 6 SERVINGS: 6 G PROTEIN, 3 G FAT, 5 G CARBOHYDRATE; 127 MG SODIUM; 15 MG CHOLESTEROL.

From "Eating Well", Jan/Feb, 1992.

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