Chocolate ruffle cake pt1

Yield: 1 Servings

Measure Ingredient
3 tablespoons Hot clarified unsalted butter
1 teaspoon Pure vanilla extract (optional)
⅓ cup Plus
1 tablespoon Sifted all-purpose flour
⅓ cup Plus
1 tablespoon Sifted unsweetened cocoa powder, preferably Dutch-processed
4 larges Eggs
⅔ cup Sugar
1 pounds Bittersweet or semisweet chocolate, finely chopped, for ruffles
⅓ cup Water
⅓ cup Sugar
¼ cup Eau-de-vie de framboise or white rum (up to 1/3)
3 cups Creme fraiche, homemade or store-bought
2 teaspoons Pure vanilla extract
2 tablespoons Sugar (up to 3)
5 ounces Semisweet or bittersweet chocolate, finely chopped
3 tablespoons Boiling water
2 \N Containers (5-ounce) of fresh raspberries
3 ounces Bittersweet or semisweet chocolate, finely chopped, for the wrap

CAKE

SYRUP

FILLING

This is from the Julia Child's new series and book, Baking with Julia, and was done by Alice Medrich and is in her own words. It's long and detailed, but it has every step and tip you'll need to make the cake.

Ruffle Cake Equipment

:* 8-inch round cake pan, at least 2-inches high :* 8-inch round cake pan with removable bottom or 8-inch springform pan :* untreated heavy-duty jelly-roll pans :* rubber spatula, offset spatula, and flexible 8-inch metal icing spatula :* decorating turntable, lazy Susan, or inverted round cake pan :* ridged plastic shelf liner, freezer paper, or 055 Mylar :* parchment paper and waxed paper A majestic cake and one of many parts: a dark chocolate genoise moistened with an intoxicatingly aromatic framboise syrup, a filling of satiny creme fraiche and brilliantly red raspberries, a wrapper of dark chocolate, and a profusion of magnificent chocolate rufffles. The technique for making ruffles does take some practice, but fortunately, the mistakes are not only edible, they're usually usable -- irregularly shaped pieces still produce a knock-out confection. And the chocolate wrapper or ribbon is also eminently doable -- it is made by a method that reproduces the quality of tempering without the fuss. Professionals use acetate or Mylar as the form on which to shape the wrapper, but a trip to the hardware store will turn up ridged plastic shelf liners, the perfect material for the job.

Each part of the cake can be made ahead, so that you only have to assemble to finish on the day the cake is to be served. And don't pass up the opportunity to make this cake if you haven't the time to tackle the ruffles. You can pile the cake high with fresh raspberries, irregularly shaped pieces of chocolate, or chocolate shards, and it will still be great. Think of this cake as a format rather than a precise, can't-vary-a-thing formula: Substitute another kind of cake for the genoise, use whipped cream instead of creme fraiche, or omit the soaking syrup - the basic idea is yours to embellish.

The Cake: Position a rack in the lower third of the oven or just below the center of the oven and preheat the oven to 350F. Fit the bottom of an 8-inch round cake pan, one at least 2 inches high, with parchment paper and set aside.

Pour the clarified butter into a 1-quart bowl and stir in the vanilla extract, if you're using it. The butter must be hot when added to the batter, so either keep the bowl in a skillet of hot water or reheat at the last minute.

Although the flour and cocoa were sifted before they were measured, they need to be triple-sifted together. Sift or sieve the flour and cocoa together. Sift or sieve the flour and cocoa together 3 times, then set sifter on a plate or piece of waxed paper and return the dry ingredients to the sifter. Keep close at hand. (CONT in part 2)

Posted to EAT-L Digest 20 October 96 Date: Mon, 21 Oct 1996 10:30:07 -0400 From: Rosebud <janetm@...>

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