Tips for buying salmon

Yield: 1 info

Measure Ingredient
The 5 Species of Wild Pacific Salmon

NO INGREDIENTS

~ Buy farm-raised and wild salmon on their respective merits, as if choosing two different fish; each has its own unique, rich taste.

~ Be aware of presentation. Whole fish should be buried in ice.

Steaks and fillets should sit on foil or perforated trays that rest on ice. Direct contact with ice turns the flesh opaque. Fish should never sit in water.

~ The flesh should be firm, moist and glistening. There should be no gaps or separations in the flesh; gapping is more than likely a sign of mishandling.

~ Steaks should be cut to order if possible. Ask to have the pin bones removed from fillets.

~ Cook and eat the salmon the same day you buy it.

King or Chinook: these are the largest, fattiest, and rarest of the five Pacific Ocean species. Their average weight is 18-20 pounds, although there are plenty of 40-pounders too. Depending on the color of the flesh, they're referred to as red or white kings. Kings are mainly available from March to October. Those from the upper reaches of Alaska's Yukon and Copper Rivers and those from the Columbia River (called chinooks) are prized for their high-fat content, which gibes them a complex flavor and rich texture.

Sockeye or Red: these are the second fattiest and weigh 3-6 pounds.

They are available from late May through July. Look for fish from British Columbia's Fraser River and Alaska's Copper River.

Coho or Silver: these weigh from 2-12 pounds and are available from July through September. Small cohos, 1- to 2-pounds, are farm-raised in British Columbia and Chile.

Pink or Humpback: these are the smallest salmon, averaging about 4 pounds. They are the most abundant of the five species. Some are marketed fresh during July and August, but most are canned.

Chum or Dog: these average 8-10 pounds each. They are available from July through October. Look for fish with bright silver skins. Chum eggs are sold as salmon caviar. Food and Wine June 1995

Submitted By DIANE LAZARUS On 06-18-95

Similar recipes