Fresh spring rolls (porpia sot)

Yield: 1 servings

Measure Ingredient
FRESH SPRING ROLLS (PORPIA
SOT)
============================

Thais roll up a salad in thin, soft rice paper wrappers. Unlike deep-fried spring rolls, these are served uncooked and at room temperature. Serve whole or cut into pieces. You can add meat, seafood, fresh basil, mint leaves, chiles, avocados or asparagus.

Make sure everythingis cut to a uniform size and that nothing is runny.

2 oz Bean Sprouts 4 ea Green Onions ¼ c Bean Curd (Tofu) 8 ea Water Chestnuts 1 ea Carrot; peeled 3 ea Eggs; lightly beaten ¼ c Fresh Coriander Leaves 4 lg Rice Paper Crepes (wrappers) * NON-VEGETARIAN:

For meat eaters, add one or more of the following: 7 oz Chicken Breasts; steamed; julienned 7 oz Shrimp or Scallops; steamed 1 ea Chinese Sausage; julienned 7 oz Barbecued Pork; shredded REMOVE roots from bean sprouts. Keep in a bowl of cold water until ready to use. Cut green onions into 1½ inch lengths. Cut bean curd into small cubes or thin strips. Cube water chestnuts. Grate carrot or cut into fine matchsticks.

IN small, lightly-oiled skillet, cook eggs into a thin omelette.

Drain, cool and cut into thin shreds.

SEPARATE rice paper crepes. Dip one at a time into lukewarm water to soften; drain and lay on clean work surface. Crepes will turn white and feel rubbery and pliable.

LAY lines of prepared ingredients along with coriander leaves and choice of non-vegetarian items on ⅓ of each wrapper. Roll up tightly, tucking ends as you roll. Transfer to tray; cover with a damp cloth or plastic wrap until ready to serve (crepes will dry out within 10 minutes in open air). Cut each roll into five bite-size pieces. Serve on a bed of lettuce, garnish with raw vegetables and serve with plum and hot sauce **.

Makes 20 pieces.

* Packages of large, dry rice paper circles are available in Oriental grocery stores. They keep indefinitely.

** Serve these rolls with a familiar plum sauce and with Sriracha sauce, the universal Thai bottled sauce made from hot red chiles, vinegar, salt and sugar. It comes in mild, medium and hot (the rating is on the neck of the bottle), and is available in many Chinese and most southeast Asian stores.

From An Article: Try Your Hand At Thai Treats by Elizabeth Baird in the Toronto Star 21 June, 1995. From Book: Thai Sensations (MacMillan) by Sherry Brydson Transcribed By: S. Lefkowitz

From: Sam Lefkowitz Date: 06-21-95 (14:56) (164) Fido: Home Co

Similar recipes